MOB systems, AMEC is in

AMEC_MOB_Dolphin.JPG

When I first met Alltek Marine Electronics Corp. in late 2007, the team was working on a LifeTag-like MOB system (speaking of Raymarine).  Well, now the AMEC MOB Dolphin is apparently ready to go, including FCC approval.  The idea of plotting MOBs on an AMEC Camino 201 Class B AIS transponder seems to have gone by the wayside, but a single-hander can set up the system so that his/her connected AMEC AIS will send out an SRM message if the worst happens.  I’m not sure how well that will work as Safety Related Messages seem to be a little used part of the AIS system.  But the MOB Dolphin does come with an interesting-looking PC program for monitoring and managing the up-to-99 pendants it can handle…

You can learn more from the brochure and manual available on AMEC’s download page, where you’ll also find an “MOB Product Brief” that I’m not sure AMEC meant for public consumption, but which may be valuable to anyone considering an MOB system.  The page below, for instance, summarizes the feature sets of the many competitors, at least from AMEC’s point of view, and also suggests that its Dolphin system will soon get an engine shut off feature, much like the Autotether I’ve tested.  (And Autotether, I note, now has a “Screamer” model of sailboats and/or tender monitoring.)  At any rate, AMEC plans a $399 MSRP for a basic MOB Dolphin kit — a controller box and two pendants, which include “high beam LEDs” by the way — and I’d guess they are looking for interested distributors or partner companies.

PS Sorry, the product comparison table has been removed at AMEC’s request, but here’s a screenshot of the management software:

AMEC_MOB_Dolphin_software.jpg



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Ben Ellison

Ben Ellison

Panbo editor, publisher & chief bottlewasher from 4/2005 until 8/2018, and now excited to have Ben Stein as very able publisher, webmaster, and editing colleague. Panbo is going to the next level in 2019 and beyond.

7 Responses

  1. marinate says:

    Interesting to read about the use of AIS Safety Related Messages, especially as the IMO are moving to discourage use of these:
    http://www.imo.org/includes/blastData.asp/doc_id=11185/46.pdf

  2. Benoit (fr) says:

    Another MOB device which don’t send information to AutoPilot… It’s useless if you are alone on your sail boat.

  3. Ash Phayer says:

    I have used this device and can tell everyone it works very well. I have found that using the repeater function gives this device a useful application and having individual programmed wrist bands for large groups is great in making sure that you have everyone onboard. I have not used this with only one person and I am not sure that using the SRM message would be useful due to nobody really even knowing how to identify it through most peoples displays.

  4. Charlie Hsu says:

    Hi Ben,
    Thanks for the posting.
    The file was NOT intended for public use and was uploaded by mistakes. Please help to remove the comparison table.
    Your kindly help is highly appreciated.
    Charlie Hsu

  5. Anonymous says:

    Hi Benoit,
    Your idea seems interesting.
    May you elaborate it more? My email contact is: charliehsu@alltekmarine.com
    Charlie

  6. Benoit (fr) says:

    Like i say by phone, you can send a bearing NMEA sentence to autopilot with +90� each 30 seconds.
    if the skipper drags a heaving line he can try to catch it.
    Because if you are alone (alarm useless) to sail (engine switch off useless) across oceans (limit DSC coverage), you want to keep your vessel within swimming.
    With RAYMARINE life taf, there is an electrical output. You can plug it on a relay near autopilot compass device to make to the boat a full turn. But it’s not so easy.
    sory for my english 😉

  7. Anonymous says:

    Hi Benoit,
    Thanks.
    Charlie

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