Tacktick mn30/T033, economy wireless

Tacktick_mn30_T033_economy_wind_lr.JPG

I’ve had impressive results with the Tacktick Micronet system on the Annie G., but the gear is expensive. Good then that Tacktick has introduced an economy version of the T101 wind system, called the mn30 and/or T033 (click on photo above for larger version). The nifty solar-powered, wireless masthead sensor is the same, but the display is powered from a boat’s 12v supply instead of solar cells. Which seems like a reasonable trade for a discount of over $400 retail, and might even be preferable on boats where the display doesn’t get sufficient sunlight. Actually, there may be some other features missing from the mn30/T033 that I haven’t found yet. But I do know that it supports basic calibration like offset and speed %, and can integrate with a Micronet wireless speedo or NMEA box (& GPS) for True Wind readings. Here’s the manual PDF and U.S. distributor Ocean Equipment’s listing.

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Ben Ellison

Ben Ellison

Panbo editor, publisher & chief bottlewasher from 4/2005 until 8/2018, and now excited to have Ben Stein as very able publisher, webmaster, and editing colleague. Panbo is going to the next level in 2019 and beyond.

14 Responses

  1. norse says:

    Why the two-moustache display? The manual calls them the head and tail wind angle pointers. Does the tail pointer have any useful value?
    Are sailors really happy with this wind angle display? I wouldn’t be. It doesn’t replace a Windex.
    The manual also says it operates on either 868 MHz or 916 MHz.

  2. Benoit says:

    I’ve spoke with Takctick people at Paris Boat Show, they prepare a new NMEA2000 compliant box for this year. To be continued.
    ++

  3. Ben Ellison Ben Ellison says:

    Thanks, Benoit, that’s excellent news. I’ve been asking Tacktick about that possibility for a while. Guess I should hang out more in Paris 😉

  4. Dan Corcoran (b393capt) says:

    Why replace the windex Norse ?
    I like the arrangement I have on my sailboat, where the windex is mounted at the rear of the mast head, is oversized and easy to see, whereas the cup and vane sensor is angled up and forward, and made extremely small and lightweight to minimize measurement distortions.

  5. norse says:

    The Windex is an incredible instrument: simple, extremely accurate, highly sensitive, and not expensive. I don’t plan to replace it. On the down side, it’s a an uncomfortable neck position looking up all the time and it’s hard to look at it when the sun is just behind it. So a supplement would be nice. The Tacktick gives a visual impression of the wind direction, but I know that already; it doesn’t give me a precise direction to sail by unless I look at it really closely and count the little tic-marks. You have to hook it up with NMEA to some other display to get a better presentation. Just my opinion.
    I’ve always wondered why wind instruments cost almost as much as a low end radar, especially since bicycle speedos are cheap. Just for fun, here’s a cute (cheap) one based on a bicycle computer:
    http://www.weathershop.com/vortex.htm

  6. Ben Ellison Ben Ellison says:

    You’ve got to be kidding, Norse. A Windex may be accurate in the sense of pointing at the apparent wind, but no human watching one from below can derive nearly as accurate a wind angle from one as they can from a decent wind display. Even on the wind, when the Windex is close to its windward reference marks. Very few racing sailors use Windexes, even in small boats, and there’s a reason for that.
    By the way, the Tacktick display in the photo above, and in my pictures, is set to show a wide wind arrow, for visibility. There is a narrower arrow available, but even the wide one is much more informative about apparent wind angle than a Windex. Of course it can show true wind angle too, and speed, even better.

  7. norse says:

    As an ex one-design dinghy racer, my opinion is that the sailor should first just know (feel) where the wind is, second sail by the jib telltales (and feel), and third look at a wind instrument. The test of a “decent” wind instrument is whether it is better than a Windex when you are steering by the wind (as when close hauled, or maybe on a run). That’s a harder test than it sounds. The accuracy at the other points of sail doesn’t matter much, IMHO. The actual number of degrees of the apparent wind doesn’t matter either, unless you are referring to polar diagrams. The worst case is really light wind and big waves, so the Windex just tells you about the mast movement.

  8. Dan Corcoran (b393capt) says:

    Norse wrote “the windex just tells you about the mast movement” … so true !

  9. Ben Ellison Ben Ellison says:

    I’m with you on ‘feel’, Norse. When I taught adult sailing, one of my tricks was to get the students to lay around the cockpit, eyes closed, while I steered and trimmed and explained what I was doing. Then of course I’d shut up and have them try to feel wind direction, point of sail, poor trim, etc.
    I also used to be pretty derisive about wind instruments. Until I had charge of a hot C&C 40 that could nicely ghost in zephyrs that were invisible on the water and unfeelable on deck.

  10. Any idea if two displays could use data from the same masthead sensor? That would be a nice way to have a repeater at the nav station.

  11. Ben Ellison Ben Ellison says:

    Significant “gotcha” learned in Miami: this economy gauge can not change wind angle scales and become a close hauled instrument like its big brother.

  12. Tim says:

    Talking to the Tacktick guys at London Boat Show, I got the impression that this was intended as an “entry level” instrument, and that they were particularly hoping to attract powerboaters.
    Wind info is good to have when you are trying to berth a boat that will do three knots sideways, but the price of their standard instrument was a bit steep. So they’ve stripped out some of the sailing features, and powered the display off the boat’s batteries. Makes sense to me — even as someone who can helm a sailing boat just fine on the telltales alone (;-) And I’m pretty certain that you can get rid of the tail-fin on the display if you prefer.

  13. Dan Corcoran (b393capt) says:

    Tim … did the tack tick guys mention any plans to offer more of their displays with hardwired 12v power and at a lower price ?
    While I am a huge fan of their wireless data capability and the heavy sailing focus of their products, I would be quick to forego the solar option if it meant a big decrease in price.

  14. svamulet says:

    Why does their website and user manual say only for use on sailboats 35′ and under? My mast head is approximately 58′ from the intended display, will it work or not? My boat is over 35′, so what, give us some specs please. I actually prefer 12 v powered displays to the hassle and long term reliability and replacement problems of internal batteries. They say only Tacktick dealers can replace the battery not so easy as we’re sialing around the world! The wireless sensor inputs (especially masthead) is great otherwise they should offer standard powered displays, the power useage is truly minimal.
    Chris

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